Category Archives: Swimming Pool Chemicals

How does a swimming pool leak sealer work?

If you have a leak in your pool  you are faced with two major problems. One is finding where the leak is and the other is the expense of digging down and repairing it. Getting a professional in to find and fix the leak will probably cost a minimum of £150 and you could end up with a bill in the thousands.

Before you call in the pool engineer it is surely worth £20.00 to see if Lo-Chlor Leak Sealer will solve the problem. You don’t need to find the leak, Leak Sealer will do that for you, and you don’t have to dig down on it.

The leak sealer contains a special chemical that remains liquid when in water but as soon as it comes in contact with air it forms a solid. So as soon as your water leaks through the hole and comes in contact with air it forms a solid plug and seals up the hole.

The leak in your pool needs to be relatively small, about 2cms per day and we can’t promise that it will work but we have had many very happy customers who, faced with a probable bill for hundreds of pounds, found that Leak Sealer did the repair job for them at a cost of £20.

Lo-Chlor Leak Sealer. £20 spent could save you hundreds.

Solving the problems of Scale build up in swimming pools

The build up of scale on the side of a pool or on the surface of your pool cover is a problem that many pool owners face. This article will give some advice on how to deal with it.

Scale or Limescale on your pool starts life as limestone in the rocks that our rain falls upon. The rain dissolves the limestone and it ends up in our drinking water and swimming pool water. Limestone is calcium carbonate, chemical symbol CaCO3. A mix of calcium, carbon and oxygen. Because we never see it in its pure form it is often forgotten that calcium is a metal.

When water evaporates, as it does all the time from the surface of your pool cover, it is the water (H2O) that evaporates leaving behind the calcium carbonate behind as a white, scaley deposit. The easiest way to deal with with the scale deposits is to put an acid on it and the acid will react with the scale and remove it. Typically in swimming pools the acid is phosphoric acid which turns the calcium carbonate into calcium phosphate (as found in your bones) which stays in the water and does not form a scale. Products like Spa No Scale contain phosphoric acid. The problem with using a chemical like that in a pool is that the phosphate formed by the reaction with the carbonate is food for algae. So you solve the scale problem but can cause an algae problem.

No More Scale will prevent limescale build up on your pool cover and pool walls

Another way to deal with the problem of limescale deposits is to prevent it from depositing. Lo-Chlor make a chemical they call No More Scale which does just this. Instead of reacting with calcium carbonate to form a different chemical it sequesters it. Seqestering is a complicated reaction but involves a chemical that bonds to a metal and prevents it from coming out of solution ie being deposited on your pool walls. Calcium is a metal, remember. So No More Scale bonds to the limescale and stops it from being left behind when the water evaporates from your pool. It doesn’t just work on the calcium in limescale it works on all metals so it will help with Iron stains as well.

We recommend that you dose your pool with No More Scale once a year in the spring to prevent scale build up on your pool cover.

Shutting down a pool for winter

A huge number of our customers have been regular customers of ours since we began 17 years ago so we assume that they are experienced at closing the pool down for the winter but no matter how many times you have closed your pool down it never hurts to go over the procedure again so you can be sure you haven’t forgotten anything.

The water

You should have had the pH in the correct range but if not now is your last chance. Get the water  to a pH of 7.2 to 7.6 by adding Dry Acid or Soda Ash if necessary.

Kill off any possible remaining algea. Shock dose your water with unstabilised chlorine – raise the chlorine levels to 6 to 10 ppm. Keep your pump running for 6 to 12 hours to distribute the chlorine to all parts of the pool.

Keep the green stuff out for the next few months. Add a winterising product – this is a long life algicide designed to keep your pool free of algae over the winter months. Keep your pump running for 6 to 12 hours to distribute the algicide to all parts of the pool. We like Perfect Super Concentrated Winter Aligicide.

Allow for winter rainfall.  Switch your skimmer valve off and drain the water down to 4 to 6 inches below the bottom of the skimmer. This is to allow for the winter rainfall to bring the level back up otherwise the pool could overflow.

Allow for freezing. Protect your walls from damage by expanding ice by floating something on the water surface to absorb expansion. This can be polystyrene or used chemical containers half filled with water. It is a good idea to tether them around the pool because they can all end up in one corner.

The Covers

Tidy away the summer cover. Take your summer cover off and give it a thorough clean with fresh water. If possible jet it off with a pressure washer but don’t use too much intensity if your cover is quite old. Either fold it up and pack it away somewhere dry or leave it on the roller but cover it over with a winter storage cover.

Keep the leaves out. Put your winter debris cover on the pool to keep as many leaves out as possible. Always tension it as tight as possible. You do not want it dangling in the water. You may need to re-tension it after the first two or three days.

The Equipment

Proctect the expensive stuff. Once you have circulated your chemicals and drained down the top level it is time to drain the water out of your pump, filter and heater. Each should have a drain plug at the bottom to let the water out. This is so it does not freeze inside it and damage it.

Check the water clarity from time to time and if it looks like algae is coming back put some more winteriser chemical in. Despite what they say about lasting 6 months we think 3 months is the duration time for winter alicides.

A review of the Zodiac range of salt chlorination products

This article is about the Zodiac range of salt chlorination products and it is assumed that you know what salt chlorination of a swimming pool is and you are aware of the benefits of salt chlorination. If this does not apply to you then have a read of our article on How Salt Chlorination Works and The Pros and Con of Salt Chlorination

Zodiac are a leading manufacturer of salt chlorination products and dosing systems and we stock four of their products, We will explain here what each of them and how they work together (or not).

The Zodiac EI

The Zodiac EI is a great product. It is an easy to install retro-fit salt chlorinator. It is the entry level, manual control, salt chlorinator and is the only unit most pool owners will need.

The Zodiac TRI

The Zodiac TRI can be retro-fitted but it involves alteration to the pipework whereas the EI does not. The TRI is very easy to install on a new build pool. The TRI purchased on its own works exactly the same way as the EI so if all you want is a basic salt chlorinator then get the EI. The advantage the TRI has over the EI is that you can add modules to the control panel to turn it in to an automatic controller. You can add a pH control unit that will automatically regulate the pH or the “pro” unit will automatically regulate the pH and Chlorine level in your pool.

The Zodiac pH Expert

The Zodiac pH Expert is a stand alone pH dosing unit that can be used on any swimming pool to regulate the pH. If you have an EI unit you could add this product to make sanitising and regulating the pH easy. You don’t have to have a salt chlorinator to use the Zodiac pH Expert

The Zodiac Chlor Expert.

The Zodiac Chlor Expert is  also a stand alone dosing unit and is a bit of red herring in the context of salt chlorinators because you will not need this unit if you have a salt chlorinator. The Chlor Expert regulates the Chlorine level in your pool by injecting liquid chlorine when required. So a pool without a salt chlorinator could be fully automated by installing this unit as well as the pH Expert.

We hope that this article has given an insight into the four Zodiac product that we sell but if you have any questions then please call our experts on 0800 690 6288

Keeping Cool & Staying Safe This Summer

Last month brought us a wave of unsettling news stories and media warnings as to the dangers of being a weak swimmer, and the risks of drowning across the nation. Make sure that you and your family are kept safe this Summer while you beat the heat by brushing up on your swimming skills.

 

Swimming lessons are a compulsory part of primary school education today, with children in Key Stage 2 (aged between 7 and 11) required to be able to swim unaided for at least twenty-five metres. Despite this statutory requirement of the National Curriculum, it is still speculated that one in every three primary school leavers is unable to swim. Research conducted by breakfast cereal giant Kellogg’s, in association with the Amateur Swimming Association, has revealed that 200,000 students will finish year 6 this year without the necessary training to swim safely unassisted.

 

Of these children, 80,000 will not even have been offered swimming lessons.

 

Swimming Pool Safety

Teaching them to enjoy the water safely is one of the best gifts you can give your kids

This lack of concern shown for the importance of teaching kids to swim is contributing to a worrying rise of drowning-related deaths. Every year, the United Kingdom loses over three hundred children younger than age five in swimming pool accidents – with over three thousand others ending up undergoing emergency treatment following a narrowly-averted tragedy.

 

Keep your kids safe this summer – enrol them in a swimming class, if they’re young or inexperienced in the water, and speak to the headmaster or headmistress of their primary school, to confirm that swimming lessons are provided for students. Most importantly, though, never leave young children unattended in (or even near!) a swimming pool.

 

Children can drown in less than two inches of water, and may be unable to raise the alarm, if you are too far to see what’s going on. Never allow children to be left alone near a swimming pool, unless the pool is completely inaccessible (behind a fence or a locked gate, etc.)

 

But kids will be kids – and in case your little ones do manage to slip past you into the swimming pool area, keeping some basic but essential supplies close at hand down by the pool can avert disaster. Ring buoys are a flotation device that can be thrown to toddlers (or any swimmer) in trouble to prevent them sinking below the surface, and a reach pole is used to pull struggling swimmers to the side.

 

As vital as it is to teach children of the dangers the water can pose, it’s equally important to teach them not to fear swimming unduly. Splashing around in a pool is one of the greatest and simplest joys a child can experience, and swimming is a skill that can be of huge benefit later in life. It would be a great shame to have that experience go to waste.